Dear community: Please be sure to bring your ID and insurance card (if you are insured) with you to the visit. You may come get tested at any point before or after your scheduled time.

Vaccinations


 


COVID-19 VACCINES

We now offer COVID-19 vaccinations. Moderna, Pfizer, and Johnson & Johnson available.

No appointments necessary.

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Get Vaccinated Today

We offer no cost COVID-19 vaccinations to everyone. Our sites are contactless, drive-thru sites, managed by our professional Test4free.org team members. Upon arrival, they will record your information, provide consent forms, and administer the vaccination.

Whether you are insured or not, we have vaccines available for you.

We see patients in the following surrounding areas: Charlotte, Gastonia, & Pineville, North Carolina. As well as Franklin Square, Lenox, Alpharetta, and Atlanta, Georgia to name a few. Book an appointment or simply drive up to one of our locations to get vaccinated today.

 

How Do I Get My Vaccine?

1. You can request an appointment online or simply drive up to our site for a first or second shot!

2. Once at one of our locations, one of our professional Test4free.org team members will get you started.

3. You'll be administered your shot by one of our medical professionals, and be done in minutes!

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FAQs


Do I need insurance? What is the cost?

You may not have out-of-pocket costs if using insurance or if you are eligible for no-cost testing according to federal or state guidelines. You should contact your insurer to confirm coverage before scheduling a test. You may be responsible for the full price of the test ($149.99) if you do not meet the criteria established by your insurer.

What happens during a vaccination visit?

You will be asked to provide your identification and health insurance, if applicable. A vaccination consent form will be provided to fill out. When the consent form is completed, you will be asked which vaccine you would like.

After your vaccination has been administered by our provider, you will be given back your identifications and a vaccination certificate card.

You will be asked to pull over into a designated parking spot for a 15 minute optional observation period before you may leave.

Can I receive my second vaccine shot if I received my first at another site?

Yes, we will asses your information and ensure you are administered the correct vaccine type based on your first shot.

What happens after a vaccination visit?

Common side effects:

  • - On the arm where you got the shot: Pain, Redness, Swelling
  • - Throughout the rest of your body: Tiredness, Headache, Muscle pain, Chills, Fever, and Nausea
  • - If you have pain or discomfort after getting your vaccine, talk to your doctor about taking an over-the-counter medicine, such as ibuprofen or acetaminophen.

To reduce pain and discomfort where you got the shot: Apply a clean, cool, wet washcloth over the area. Also, use or exercise your arm.

To reduce discomfort from fever: Drink plenty of fluids, Dress lightly.

In most cases, discomfort from fever or pain is normal.

Contact your doctor or healthcare provider: If the redness or tenderness where you got the shot increases after 24 hours. If your side effects are worrying you or do not seem to be going away after a few days.

Keep in mind, side effects may affect your ability to do daily activities, but they should go away in a few days. With some COVID-19 vaccines, you will need 2 shots in order to get the most protection.

You should get the second shot even if you have side effects after the first shot, unless a vaccination provider or your doctor suggests otherwise.You will only need 1 shot of the viral vector COVID-19 vaccine, Johnson & Johnson’s Janssen COVID-19 Vaccine. It takes time for your body to build protection after any vaccination. COVID-19 vaccines that require 2 shots may not protect you until about two weeks after your second shot. For COVID-19 vaccines that require 1 shot, it takes about two weeks after vaccination for your body to build protection.

To learn more please visit CDC guidelines link here

 

Are You At Risk?